Skip to Main Content

++

Neuropathology

++
++
++ ++
FIG. 15-1

(Reproduced with permission from Amato AA, Russell JA. Neuromuscular Disorders. New York: McGraw-Hill; 2008.)

Graphic Jump Location
++
++
++

(A) polymyositis

++
++

(B) dermatomyositis

++
++

(C) mitochondrial myopathy

++
++

(D) inclusion body myositis

++
++

(E) a cluster of regenerating muscle fibers

++
++

(C) Figure 15-1 illustrates a modified Gomori–trichome stain of a muscle biopsy. It reveals a ragged-red fiber in a patient with mitochondrial myopathy. (Amato, 73)

++
++
++

Figure 15-2 is a myofibrillary adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase)-stained slide. The dark fibers are characterized by

++
FIG. 15-2

(Reproduced with permission from Amato AA, Russell JA. Neuromuscular Disorders. New York: McGraw-Hill; 2008.)

Graphic Jump Location
++
++
++

(A) a slow twitch speed

++
++

(B) an intermediate resistant to fatigue

++
++

(C) strong staining with modified Gomori trichome

++
++

(D) high myoglobin content

++
++

(E) high glycogen content

++
++

(B) The myofibrillar adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) is typically performed at three pHs: 4.3, 46, and 9.4 in order to assess the size and the distribution of different muscle fiber types. Individual muscle fibers can be classified into four different fiber types based on their staining characteristics and physiological properties: type I (slow-twitch, fatigue-resistant, with oxidative metabolism), 2A (fast-twitch, intermediate fatigue resistance, with oxidative and glycolytic metabolism), 2B (fast-twitch, poor fatigue resistance, with glycolytic metabolism), and 2C (undifferentiated and embryonic). The specific muscle fiber type is determined by the innervating motor neuron. The different muscle fibers type are distributed randomly. Figure 15-2 shows a muscle biopsy myofibrillary adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) staining at a pH 9.4. Type 1 fibers are lightly stained while type 2 fibers are dark. (Amato, 74–75)

++
++
++ ++
FIG. 15-3

(Reproduced with permission from Amato AA, Russell JA. Neuromuscular Disorders. New York: McGraw-Hill; 2008.)

Graphic Jump Location
++
++
++

(A) ragged-red fibers

++
++

(B) inclusion body myositis

++
++

(C) polymyositis

++
++

(D) amyloid deposition

++
++

(E) glycogen deposition

++
++

(D) Congo red stain was used in Figures 15-3A and B. It demonstrates amyloid deposition surrounding muscle fibers and blood vessels. Under routine ...

Pop-up div Successfully Displayed

This div only appears when the trigger link is hovered over. Otherwise it is hidden from view.